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Pupil Premium & Year 7 catch-up premium

The Tonbridge Federation

Please note that the data in this report is based on the school's own analysis. The report was considered and approved by the Governing Body prior to the publication of national data by the Department for Education.

Pupil Premium Reporting to Parents & Carers

Principles for the use of funding agreed by the Governing Body:

  • We ensure that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all of our children.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for children who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of socially disadvantaged children are adequately assessed and addressed.
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged children, we recognise that not all children who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged. We also recognise that not all children who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium Funding to support any child or group of children the federation has legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.
  • Pupil Premium Funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority groups or individuals. Limited funding and resources means that not all children receiving free school meals will be in receipt of Pupil Premium interventions at one time.

Provision

The Governors will allocate Pupil Premium Funding in order to:

  • Establishing smaller development group class sizes thus improving opportunities for effective assessment and accelerating progress.
  • Providing small group work with an experienced teacher focussed on overcoming gaps in learning, especially in literacy and numeracy.
  • Provide one to one or small group behavioural and emotional support to vulnerable students.
  • Additional teaching and learning opportunities provided through qualified teachers, trained teaching assistants or external agencies.
  • Provide opportunities for both curricular and extra-curricular activities that broaden the experience of all children, especially those who are disadvantaged.

All our work through the Pupil Premium will be aimed at accelerating progress moving all children to at least age related expectations. A particular focus will be placed on improving Literacy and Numeracy.

Plan for 2016/17

The school’s pupil premium grant allocation for the academic year 2016/17 is £230,009.

The main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible students in the school include:

  • Whilst improving, rates of authorised absence for eligible students are high.
  • Whilst improving, the number of eligible students who are excluded compared to non-disadvantaged is high.
  • Whilst improving, the number of red flags issued to eligible students for incidences of poor behaviour is still higher (as a proportion of the population) than non-pupil Premium students.
  • Typically over half the eligible students in each year group are low attainers on entry. Both reading and spelling ages are typically far lower than other students and well below their chronological ages.
  • A significant number of our eligible students require intensive  intervention to support them with their health, wellbeing and social circumstances outside of school.
  • Many eligible students find  independent learning at home difficult.
  • Many eligible students have limited opportunities outside of school to experience culture.
  • Analysis of 2016 shows that high ability disadvantages students are the group making the lowest progress compared to their peers.

In order to address these issues, the school is taking the following actions in this academic year:

  1. Continuing to invest in teaching staff to ensure class sizes are typically less than 30. Given the significant number of low attaining eligible students, classes sizes for these ability sets should be typically 20 or fewer. This will enable these students to receive greater attention to help them make increased progress. (£80.000)
  2. Continuing to support the development group concept for our weakest students academically in a very small class. This group has a clear focus on improving both reading and spelling ages so eligible students are able to access the wider curriculum. (£44,000)
  3. Improve the reading ages of eligible students using the Sound Training programme intervention. (£4000). Ensuring that high ability students have access to this as a priority.
  4. Continue to invest in the Library to provide wide access to all eligible students to good quality books. Hugh Christie has the largest school Library in Kent. (£5500)
  5. Allocating Pupil Premium Funding to ensure all students are able to participate in trips and visits that broaden their cultural experiences. (£2000)
  6. Allocating Pupil Premium Funding to events inside school to broaden participation by all students, including those eligible for funding(£6000
  7. Employ a school counsellor for four days a week and a behavioural specialist teacher for three days a week to provide intervention to ensure at risk eligible students are able to access and enjoy school. (£85000)
  8. Continue to improve the attendance of eligible students through additional staffing in administration and student services to identify, challenge and support low attendance before it becomes serious and impacts on achievement. (£15,500). Ensure the attendance of high ability students is closely monitored.
  9. Provide additional support (twice a week) after normal school hours with teachers to support eligible students who are not making the appropriate progress with their work. (£3000). Encourage participation by high attaining students.
  10. Provide intervention in Year 11 to support eligible students with revisiting key topics for their examinations. (£5000). Monitor the participation of high attaining pupils.

Total agreed spending – £250,000

Governor contribution - £20,000

Impact assessment

We will measure the impact of this work every six week (impact assessment) by looking at the following key indicators:

  1. The rates of progress of eligible students compared to others across a range of subjects considering their starting points.
  2. The attendance of eligible students compared to others
  3. The number of fixed term exclusions issued to eligible students compared to others.
  4. The number of red flags for behavioural concerns issued to eligible students compared to others.

The names of all eligible students not making appropriate educational progress will be discussed by teachers with their Head of Department. The appropriate intervention will then be recorded and changes will considered at the following impact assessment.

All eligible students who are persistently absent, or at risk of becoming so, will be identified after each impact assessment and a programme of intervention, using the available and appropriate staffing, will be established. Improvement will be considered at the following impact assessment.

All eligible students who have received more than one fixed term exclusion will have a Behavioural Support Plan that utilises resources available through additional funding.

All eligible students whose number of red flags increases between one impact assessment and another, will be identified and supported to improve.

The participation of Pupil Premium students in extra-curricular activities will also be monitored and reported at the end of the year as part of the school’s review.

The strategy is reviewed after each impact assessment by the school leadership team. This is considered by Governors at the mid and end of year review.

Review of 2015/16

Pupil Premium at Hugh Christie Technology College has been used for the following purposes in 2015/16:

  1. Provide and maintain additional teaching staff to facilitate the creation of a smaller development group to enable focussed and targeted intervention for students of low ability on entry (£32,000)
  2. Targeted intervention for students early in Key Stage 4 to help them achieve expected progress in all subjects but especially English, Maths and Science, achieved through additional staffing  within these curriculum areas (£64,000)
  3. One to one and small group intervention providing specialised input to improve rates of progress in literacy and English including the use of Sound Training targeted at students whose reading ages are well below chronological (£40,000)
  4. Provision of ‘The Lighthouse’ as an internal alterative curriculum provision which will ensure more disadvantaged students will remain in full time education and avoid exclusion (£83,000)
  5. Employing additional staff to support students with particular needs which are a barrier to their achievement – Counsellor, Behaviour specialist, Family Intervention Manager (£121,000)
  6. Purchasing external support for students with particular needs including careers advice and guidance, education psychology, and improving wellbeing. (£20,000)
  7. Subsidising the purchase of a laptop computer to give all students the opportunity of owning their personal learning device (£9000)
  8. Ensuring equal opportunities for disadvantaged students by supporting trips, visits, other non-compulsory school opportunities and uniform (£5000).

 

Total spent = £374,000

Total Pupil Premium grant = £266,582

Year 7 catch-up funding = £17,000

Governors contribution (from the school’s delegated budgeted) to additional Pupil Premium related activities = £90,418

Number and percentage of students officially eligible for Pupil Premium funding in 2015/16:

Year 7

60

42%

Year 8

46

36%

Year 9

51

39%

Year 10

41

33%

Year 11

40

29%

 

 

In 2016, nearly half of the students receiving Pupil Premium were low ability on entry.

Impact of Pupil Premium funding

Overall, the progress of Pupil Premium students in Year 11 in 2016 was improved compared to 2015.

The ‘Progress 8’ score for Year 11 Pupil Premium students was -0.9 in 2015. This means that Pupil Premium students performed nearly a grade below how all students (Pupil Premium and Non Pupil Premium) progressed nationally. Provisional results show this improving to -0.7 in 2016; this is two thirds lower than the national level for all students.  This means Pupil Premium students improved by one fifth of a grade in 2016.

Progress in English improved from -0.7 in 2015 to -0.5 in 2016. This means Pupil Premium students improved by about a fifth of a grade in English.

Progress in Maths improved from -0.8 in 2015 to -0.3 in 2015. This means Pupil Premium students improved by nearly half a grade in Maths.

Overall, the gap in attainment between Pupil Premium Students and others is again lower than the gap nationally.

The gap between the proportion of Year 11 Pupil Premium students achieving five or more GCSE grades in 2016, including English and Maths was -25%. This is 2% better than the 2015 national gap of -27%. The gap between the proportion of Year 11 Pupil Premium students achieving the basics (GCSE Maths and English)  in 2016 was -23%. This is 4% better than the 2015 national gap of -27%.

More Pupil Premium students are achieving the EBACC qualification.

The percentage of Year 11 Pupil Premium students achieving the EBACC qualification was 18% in 2016. This is a 14% improvement on 2015 and is 7% above the 2015 national.

Performance compared to prior attainment of disadvantaged students

The overall progress made by middle and low ability students improved significantly ion 2016 compared to 2015. Middle ability students improved by nearly half a grade with lower ability students improving by over one grade. Higher ability pupil premium students did not improve their progress as identified above.

The gap (comparing 2016 with 2015) between the overall progress made by Pupil Premium students compared to non-Pupil Premium students closed for middle ability students and low ability students. The gap for higher ability widened because of the persistent absence of a significant number within this group.

The expected progress gaps have also narrowed in English and Maths for middle ability students. The gap for lower ability students narrowed in Maths but widened slightly in English (although contextual progress was better than expected nationally). The gaps widened for higher ability students for the reasons described above.

The gap between the Pupil Premium and non- Pupil Premium middle and lower ability students achieving the basics remained the same in 2016. The same percentage of middle ability Pupil Premium students achieved EBACC compared to non- Pupil Premium students.

Pupil Progress is monitored across the school for students in receipt of Pupil Premium.

  • Current data indicates that Pupil Premium students are making good progress or improving their rates of progress in English in Year 8, 9 and 10.
  • Current data indicates that Pupil Premium students need to improve rates of progress in Maths across Years 8, 9 and 10.
  • Current data indicates that Pupil Premium students are making good progress or improving their rates of progress in Science in Year 8 and 9 but need to make improvements in Year 10.

The impact of Pupil Premium funding to support lower ability students through the creation of a development group has been to improve their rates of progress.

  • The progress of low ability Year 11 students in English was +0.13 compared to -0.43 in 2015. This means they have improved by over half a grade.
  • The progress of low ability Year 11 students in Maths was -0.05 compared to -0.7 in 2015. This means they have improved by over half a grade.

Behaviour

Through interventions, the behaviour of students in receipt of pupil premium improved significantly in 2015/16 compared to the year before. The reduction in the number of fixed term exclusions was 35% and the reduction in the number of red flags(issued for instances of poor behaviour) fell by 38%. These improvements are much greater than for students not in receipt of Pupil Premium.

The number of green flags awarded for good work and effort rose by 36% for Pupil Premium students compared to an increase of 10% for non-Pupil Premium students.

Attendance

The absence of pupil premium students improved from 13.1% in 2015 to 10.9% in 2016. The proportion of pupil premium students who were persistently absent also improved slightly by 0.2%. This is a key action for the school in 2016/17.

Pupil premium funding has improved the participation of students with extra-curricular activities

The involvement of Pupil premium students in extra-curricular activities is encouraged and monitored. During the last academic year, 50% of students in receipt of Pupil Premium were supported to participate in at least one extra-curricular activity.

Catch-up funding

During 2016/17, £17,000 of catch-up funding was received. The funding was used to provide additional teaching capacity in Maths (0.2FTE) to reduce the class sizes in Year 7 Maths and enable more focussed teaching of the least able to accelerate progress. The funding was also used to support a teacher to provide small group intervention to help children with low levels of literacy make accelerated progress.

Impact

As a result of the intervention, children on entry with low prior attainment are making good progress.

  • Year 7 low attainers in Maths have a progress of nearly half a grade better than expected at the end of the year (+0.47)
  • Year 7 lower attainers in English have a progress of nearly a grade better than expected at the end of the year (+0.88).